Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park – Eutawville, South Carolina


South Carolina  |  SC Picture Project  |  Orangeburg County Photos  |  Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park



Sitting on the banks of Lake Marion in Eutawville is the site of the last Revolutionary War battle to take place in South Carolina. The battle occurred on September 8, 1781 when General Nathaniel Greene’s American troops attacked a British camp at the limestone springs on Eutaw Creek. The British encampment was led by Colonel Alexander Stewart. Greene and his men had been evading Lord Rawdon after an unsuccessful attempt at seizing Star Fort at Ninety-Six, where Greene and his troops were repelled. The Patriots retreated to Charlotte, North Carolina before heading towards Charleston following the return of Lord Rawdon to England.

Eutaw Springs Sign

Linda Brown of Kingstree, 2016 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

General Greene’s force of around 2,000 men set up camp along the Santee River for rest, just a couple of miles from where Colonel Stewart – Lord Rawdon’s successor – bivouacked at Eutaw Springs with 2,000 of his own men, looking for Greene. After learning that Stewart’s troops were garrisoned nearby at Eutaw Springs, Greene and his men headed towards the British encampment around 4:00 a.m. on September 8, 1781, with a scouting party leading the way. The scouts were spotted by a small detachment of Loyalists from Stewart’s camp, who were then led into an ambush by the scouting party. The ambush killed around five of Stewart’s men and led to the capture of 40. By the time Greene’s troops reached Stewart’s camp, they had captured 400 more of Stewart’s men, whom they discovered foraging for yams. Stewart had been warned of Green’s troops by one of his captains, who had escaped the ambush, and the British force was ready for battle when the Patriots arrived.

Eutaw Springs Battle Ground

Linda Brown of Kingstree, 2016 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Initially, the Americans were able to drive the British back into their camp. Yet instead of remaining focused on the battle, the Patriots took advantage of their temporary success to invade and loot the British troops’ tents. It was then that the British overtook the Americans and forced them to retreat from Eutaw Springs. Casualties on the American side, including killed, wounded, and missing, numbered over 500. For the British, the loss topped 700. Though the battle is often considered a British victory due to Stewart’s success in driving the Americans from their garrison, others give the advantage to the Americans, as the battle marked the end of British occupation in South Carolina.

Majoribanks

Linda Brown of Kingstree, 2016 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Following the battle at Eutaw Springs, the British camped at Wantoot Plantation to recover before withdrawing from South Carolina. British officer Major John Majoribanks died during his encampment at the plantation and was buried on site. When the Santee Cooper hydroelectric project began in 1939, flooding the area and many plantations to create Lake Marion and Lake Moultrie, Major Majoribanks’ grave was relocated to the battle ground. Wantoot Plantation is now submerged in Lake Moultrie.

Santee Limestone Marker

Linda Brown of Kingstree, 2016 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Also vanquished after the creation of the lakes were Eutaw Creek and the surrounding limestone springs, which were flooded when Lake Marion was built. Limestone sinks in the area formed the channels that allowed the Eutaw Springs to flow. The abundance of limestone here, which dates to 40 million years ago, makes the area a prolific producer of cement, which uses limestone.

Eutaw Springs Limestone Sign

Linda Brown of Kingstree, 2016 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

The Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park is listed in the National Register:

On September 8, 1781 General Nathanael Greene with a force of 2098 attacked a British camp of 2300 at Eutaw Springs commanded by Colonel Alexander Stuart. Greene’s goal was to strike a blow against the British forces in South Carolina and prevent them from sending aid to Cornwallis in Virginia. The tree shaded battleground park at the edge of Lake Marion includes a historic marker that tells the story and marks the site of the battle. On the grounds is the tomb of British Commander Major John Majoribanks, noted for outstanding leadership during the battle.

Reflections on Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park


Contributor Linda Brown, who sent the above photos, shares, “On a personal note, I have old newspaper clippings about my grandmother’s family, who lived in nearby Vance, regularly having picnics on the battleground during the early 1900s.”

Add your own reflections here.



Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park Info


Address: Old Number Six Highway, Eutawville, SC 29048
GPS Coordinates: 33.407333,-80.298725

Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park Map



Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park – Add Info and More Photos


The purpose of the South Carolina Picture Project is to celebrate the beauty of the Palmetto State and create a permanent digital repository for our cultural landmarks and natural landscapes. We invite you to add additional pictures (paintings, photos, etc) of Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park, and we also invite you to add info, history, stories, and travel tips. Together, we hope to build one of the best and most loved SC resources in the world!


If You Don't Have a Facebook Account, Please Comment Below




4 Comments about Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park

SCIWAYNo Gravatar says:
December 13th, 2012 at 8:23 am

Hi Ashley! Thank you for writing us! Unfortunately, we do not have any books on this battle here at the office. Your best bet would probably be to contact the Orangeburg County Historical Society. Here is there website: http://www.orangeburgh.org/

AshleyNo Gravatar says:
December 12th, 2012 at 1:20 pm

I am a teacher in SC and our standards have the Battle of Eutaw Springs. There isn’t any anything in our book about this battle and I was wondering if you had any literature, etc. thanks!

SCIWAYNo Gravatar says:
September 22nd, 2010 at 8:53 am

Hi Nancy! SCIWAY doesn’t have access to the roster for the battle, but a good place to continue your search would be our Orangeburg County Genealogy Resources page. Good luck!

Nancy LewisNo Gravatar says:
September 22nd, 2010 at 8:14 am

I’m looking for the roster of soldiers who fought in this battle – especially for my ancestor Cornelius VanOrsdel who fought in this battle





Related Pages


Camp Croft State Park

Battery Gadsden
Battery Gadsden
Sullivan's Island


Fort Jackson Headquarters

Quarters F
Quarters F
North Charleston


Quarters C
Quarters C
North Charleston


Quarters H-I
Quarters H-I
North Charleston


Laney Landing Pee Dee

Kings Mountain State Park

Eutaw Springs Battlefield Park




SC PICTURE PROJECT

Join Us on Facebook
Our 5 Goals
Our Contributors
Add Info
Add Pictures
Search for Pictures
Missing Landmarks

SC TOWNS & LANDMARKS

Abbeville ACE Basin Aiken Allendale Anderson Awendaw Bamberg Barns & Farms Barnwell Beaches Beaufort Beech Island Belton Bennettsville Bishopville Blackville Bluffton Bridges Bygone Landmarks Camden Carnegie Libraries Cemeteries Charleston Charleston Navy Base Cheraw Chester Churches Clemson Clinton Clio Colleges Columbia Conway Courthouses Darlington Denmark Dillon Donalds Easley Edgefield Edisto Elloree Fairfax Florence Folly Beach Forests and Nature Preserves Gaffney Garden City Beach Georgetown Glenn Springs Graniteville Greeleyville Greenville Greenwood Greer Hamburg Hampton Hartsville Hemingway Hilton Head Historical Photos Historic Houses Honea Path Hopkins Hunting Island Isle of Palms Jails James Island Johns Island Johnsonville Johnston Kiawah Island Kingstree Lake City Lake Marion Lakes Lancaster Landrum Latta Laurens Lexington Libraries Lighthouses Little River Manning Marion McClellanville McCormick Military Mills Moncks Corner Mountains Mount Carmel Mount Pleasant Mullins Murrells Inlet Myrtle Beach National Register Newberry Ninety Six North Augusta North Charleston North Myrtle Beach Orangeburg Parks Pawleys Island Pendleton Pickens Piers Pinopolis Plantations Port Royal Post Offices Ravenel Restaurants Ridgeway Rivers Roadside Oddities Robert Mills Rock Hill Rockville Rosenwald Schools Salters Saluda Savannah River Site SC Artists SC Heroes of the Alamo Schools Seneca Shrimp Boats Society Hill Spartanburg Sports Springs St. George St. Helena Island St. Matthews Stores Sullivan's Island Summerton Summerville Sumter Synagogues Town Clocks Trains & Depots Trees Trenton Turbeville Ulmer Union Wadmalaw Island Walhalla Walterboro Waterfalls Water Towers West Columbia Westminster Winnsboro Yemassee York

© 2016 SCIWAY.net, LLC All rights reserved.