Redcliffe Plantation – Beech Island, South Carolina


South Carolina  |  SC Picture Project  |  Aiken County Photos  |  Redcliffe Plantation

Redcliffe Plantation in Beech Island (near Aiken) was built by former US congressman and SC governor James Henry Hammond (1807-1864).

Redcliffe Plantation Home

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Four generations of Hammonds occupied this 1859 Greek-revival mansion. Governor Hammond’s great-grandson, John Shaw Billings (1898-1975), who served as the managing editor of Time and Life magazines, brought the Redcliffe mansion back to life in the 1930s. Today Redcliffe Plantation is managed by the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism. Find out more about SC governors and learn more about SC plantations.

Redcliffe Plantation – Exterior Views of the Redcliffe Home


The following images show the exterior of the Redcliffe Plantation House at various times, in various seasons, and from various angles.

Redcliffe Plantation House

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Back of Redcliffe Plantation

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation in the Snow

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Rocking Chairs

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Porch

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Aerial

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation

Michael Stroud of Bluffton, 2008 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Stables

Zanna Luhta of Ashtabula, OH, 2010 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation – Interior Views of the Redcliffe Home


These images show the interior of Redcliffe, from Governor Hammond’s study to the bedrooms upstairs.

Redcliffe Plantation Bedroom

Larry Gleason of Aiken© Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Governor Hammonds Study at Redcliffe

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Grounds


The following images show Redcliffe’s grounds, including its stables, a slave cabin, and a vegetable garden.

Redcliffe Slave Homes

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Tree

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Stables

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Stable

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Stables

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Stable

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Slave Cabin

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Redcliffe Plantation Garden

Larry Gleason of Aiken © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Magnolia Lane at Redcliffe Plantation


Magnolia Lane Redcliffe

Jenks Farmer of Beech Island, 2012 © Do Not Use Without Written Consent

Contributor Jenks Farmer shares the following about Magnolia Lane: “Redcliffe’s Magnolia Lane was SC Historic Tree of the Year, 2012. It was planned and planted with the help of two significant horticulturist (Berkman Brothers) who’s nursery became the Augusta National. The Lane was the entrance to Redcliffe and it connected two house: those of father and son Hammonds. Today, though partially disrupted, it connects Redcliffe and the Farmer’s home.”

Redcliffe Plantation is listed in the National Register:

(Redcliffe Plantation State Park) Redcliffe is representative of the architectural styles in the South during the early nineteenth century. Begun in 1857 by James Henry Hammond, it is a two-story house of wooden construction. Built on brick pillars like many of the lowcountry houses, Redcliffe maintained the pattern of a central hall with four rooms, so characteristic of the Carolina upcountry. Double-decked porches were built on all four sides. Only the front and back porches had steps down to the ground. Large French windows in all rooms opened on to the porches, upper and lower. An enclosed cupola or observatory, consisting almost entirely of windows, was built on the roof between the two chimneys.

In 1886, James Hammond’s son Henry removed the upper porch and moved the main stairs to the corner of the new porch. In 1901, the observatory on the roof was removed and replaced by a widow’s walk. Originally Georgian in style, the house now features many Greek Revival elements. Two slave quarters remain, illustrating the pattern of life prior to the Civil War. A young landscape architect, Louis Berckman from Belgium, planned the grounds at Redcliffe. The home’s builder, James H. Hammond, was elected governor of South Carolina in 1842 and served two terms. He was elected to United States Congress in 1834 and then to United States Senate in 1857. A later owner of Redcliffe is John Shaw Billings, a descendant of Hammond. Billings was Managing Editor of both TIME and LIFE magazines and eventually Editorial Director of TIME, Inc.

Redcliffe Plantation Info


Address: 181 Redcliffe Road, Beech Island, SC 29842
Website: http://www.southcarolinaparks.com/redcliffe/

Redcliffe Plantation Map



Redcliffe Plantation – Add Info and More Photos


The purpose of the South Carolina Picture Project is to celebrate the beauty of the Palmetto State and create a permanent digital repository for our cultural landmarks and natural landscapes. We invite you to add additional pictures (paintings, photos, etc) of Redcliffe Plantation, and we also invite you to add info, history, stories, and travel tips. Together, we hope to build one of the best and most loved SC resources in the world!


If You Don't Have a Facebook Account, Please Comment Below




3 Comments about Redcliffe Plantation

Karyn White says:
January 25th, 2015 at 7:21 pm

It’s a shame to see that the stable has windows.= and the slaves cabins didn't have windows. Wow!!!

George HofmeierNo Gravatar says:
January 16th, 2014 at 7:47 pm

I’m looking for any local stories handed fown from descendants of slaves. Would you know of any? I want to record what I can before the older generation passes and the stories are lost forever. I have severe epilepsy so I cannot come visit your park.

Terrell WilliamsNo Gravatar says:
April 5th, 2011 at 9:44 pm

I would love to see the place my (supposed) great, great, great-grandfather constructed.






TRENDING

January Calendar
February Newsletter
Add New Info
Add New Pictures
Our 5 Goals

SC CATEGORIES


© 2015 SCIWAY.net, LLC All rights reserved.